Archives Librarian and the benefits of time management

I work at a local history archives, connected to a county library. Until July 1, I worked a 40 hour week. However, because of budget cuts, I now work a 30 hour week. Unfortunately, I'm still expected to accomplish the same goals and tasks as before!

When I started in the Archives, 4 years ago, I did a time management track in a book, and it helped me a great deal. I can't even tell you what the book was, now.

Because I'm expected to continue producing 40 hours of work in a 30 hour workweek, I feel I need to re-prioritize and rearrange my time at work. That is what I hope this course will do for me.

Kell's reply: Thanks for your post. Unfortunately, this situation is becoming increasingly common.

I do much work on effectiveness and efficiency, and since the GFC, many companies have laid workers off but still expect the remaining workers to fill the void.

What this means is that often workers need not so much re-prioritize but rather be more ruthless on what it is that really drives their performance.

When I say ruthless, I mean thinking of the two or three things that really are important at work and protecting the hours required to move forward on these things.

At the coalface what does this mean?

It means being organized (in the hard files, soft files, and emails), monitoring and reducing time-wasting behaviors (e.g. distractions, interruptions, procrastination, and ineffective meetings), and focusing on the few things that really drive long-term performance.

Wishing you the best in good time management.

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